Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Appalachia

Music in general is an easy way for people to bond over something they have common knowledge of or have similar interests in. In the sense of the Hunger Games series, music is not a heavily referenced topic in any of the books. When music is referenced, it has a major effect on the characters, and their emotions in that place in time. The first significant use of music in The Hunger Games, happens when Katniss is placing Rue on her deathbed. Singing is a way for her to remember happier times with her father and since Rue reminded Katniss so much of Prim, it brings her back to her family. This first display of singing also sparks what could be one of Katniss’s first major acts of rebellion. In Mockingjay, the most significant aspect of music is the Hanging Tree song. Katniss had learned it from her dad when she was growing up, but was too young to understand what the lyrics meant. Another important use of music is when Peeta hears the clip of Katniss singing “Hanging Tree” while in District two. Hearing Katniss singing reminded him of her dad when he used to sing it which was a sign of hope for Katniss that she had not completely lost him to the brainwashing of the Capitol.

Music in Appalachia was very important to the people because it was a way for them to connect with others and talk about what was happening in their lives. Most of the music from Appalachia comes in the form of ballads; the telling of a story through song. They would talk about historical events and personal events in hopes that the stories would be passed down and eventually acknowledged in history. As Mr. Michael played for us, he sang a ballad about a man being hung which turned out to be a significant historical moment in history and the use of ballads has helped pass this information along to our time. 
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